Archive for Social Media – Page 2

10 LinkedIn Tips For Job Seekers And Career Shifters

1. Stop focussing on the numbers

Networking is not a numbers game, but a relationships game.

It’s not about ‘how many’ LinkedIn connections you have. But instead, the quality of the relationships and the level of interaction you have with people in your LinkedIn network that counts.

Plus, of course, the size and relevance of the network that those people are in turn connected to. Which means that someone with 50 highly relevant contacts (who they interact with frequently), will often be much more successful whilst using LinkedIn than someone with 500+ connections to people they hardly know or ever interact with.

2. Remember the 5 second rule

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Job Seekers: 10 Questions To Ask Yourself

Struggling to find a job?

Here are 10 questions to ask yourself right now:

1.  Have you reached out to your 50 warmest contacts to update them on what you’re currently doing ?

If not, send an email to update them (and NOT simply to ask for job leads).

So that’s your 50 closest friends, family members, old clients and ex-colleagues;  the people who know, like and trust you –  regardless of where they live and what they do for a living.

If they do know, how often do you stay in contact with them?

2.  If I glanced at your LinkedIn profile, would I know that you’re in the market for job opportunities? Would I know what you’re looking to do?

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Gordon Brown’s Downfall: 6 Career Lessons For Us All

Within the last 24 hours, we’ve seen the UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown step down from office. After losing last week’s general election, he will be replaced by the first coalition government in the UK for over 30 years.

Just 18 months ago Brown was playing an impressive role in leading global efforts to manage the financial crisis. Yet when it came to the election, he failed to impress the public.

While there were many policy and political factors that led to his downfall, a key part of his defeat and his exit from politics was due to Gordon Brown himself – his style and approach.

Here are 6 career lessons you can learn from Brown’s election campaign and subsequent downfall:

1. You need both style AND substance

Throughout the election campaign, Brown kept reiterating: “if this campaign is about style over substance – then count me out. I’m a man of substance, not a PR or marketing man.” Tough luck Gordon – like it or not, you’re in the marketing business. We all are. Brown, like many people, failed to actively manage his personal brand.

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Recap: LinkedIn Questions & Answers

During last week, I published 7 daily posts to answer 7 common questions I’m asked about using the professional networking site LinkedIn.com

In case you missed any of the posts, below is a quick summary. Just click through to read the post.

1.  The Number One Rule For LinkedIn Users

2.  Increasing The Number of Connections On LinkedIn

3.  How Well Must You Know Someone Before Connecting?

4.  Three Rules For Connecting With People You Don’t Know

5.  How To Get High Quality Recommendations On LinkedIn

6. Tips On What To Write In Your Status Updates

7.  What To Write In Your LinkedIn Profile When Job Searching

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By the way, if you’re currently job searching and want to know how to use LinkedIn to find your next job, you may want to take a look at my instantly downloadable audio programme: “7 Ways To Find Your Next Job Using LinkedIn.”
I’ll talk and walk you through some simple yet effective ways to speed up your job search using LinkedIn. For further details, click here now.

LinkedIn Q & A [Part 7 of 7]: What To Write In Your Profile When Job Searching

Questions: If I’m job searching, what should I put in my LinkedIn profile?

Answer: Here are 10 tips:

1. If you’ve been made redundant, don’t write “looking for a job.” Factually it may be true, but it smacks of desperation and isn’t the first impression you want to give to recruiters and contacts coming to your page.

Focus instead on telling the reader what you can do, what you can offer and who you can help by following the 9 tips below:

2. Don’t define yourself simply by your previous job titles (it limits the potential opportunities)

3. Define the target sectors, the kind of problems you can solve and the value and benefits you’ve a track record of delivering (it will open you up to different possibilities)

4. Make sure you state job titles (recruiters search using titles and so to come up on searches quote the type of key words and titles you think they’d put into search)

5. Notice how this list is full of contradictions (there’s no hard and fast rules. I’m simply sharing my experience and opinions – so make up your own rules and test them)

6. Test, try, edit, evaluate (now rinse and repeat)

7. Make the profile more than two lines please

8. But don’t tell me your life story

9. Make it slightly different or quirky from what everyone else writes on their profile (take a look at my own LinkedIn profile)

10. Be yourself. Don’t try and be different or clever by copying what everyone else writes.

Do you agree or have I got it all wrong? Feel free to share ideas or suggestions in the comments section below.

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By the way, if you’re currently job searching and want to know how to use LinkedIn to find your next job, you may want to take a look at my instantly downloadable audio programme: “7 Ways To Find Your Next Job Using LinkedIn.”
I’ll talk and walk you through some simple, yet effective, ways to speed up your job search using LinkedIn. For further details, click here.

LinkedIn Q & A [Part 6 of 7]: Status Update Tips


 

Questions: Have you any tips on what to write in the status updates on LinkedIn?

1. Be Respectful of people’s attention

Just because your contacts agreed to connect with you on LinkedIn doesn’t mean you can spam their home page every day with irrelevant updates and self promotion.

2. Be Transparent

I often see people write a status update encouraging you to click on a link which then takes you through to some random product that they’re earning affiliate income from.

I’ve no objection to people promoting and earning affiliate income – but, like most people, don’t appreciate being misled. So be transparent.

3. Be of Value

Before you post a status update, ask yourself: “Will my status update be of value to my network? Will it be interesting, useful, entertaining or beneficial in some way?

If the answer is “no” or “I’m not sure”, don’t post it.

4. Be personable

Whilst LinkedIn is a professional networking site, it also allows people to see what you’re doing and feel more connected to you, without having to exchange emails or phone calls.

So share what you’re up to occasionally. But again, just ensure it’s something that would be of interest or value to others.

It’s useful if you’re telling me that you’re preparing a presentation on xyz subject, doing some charity work, just leaving town for a business trip, just started reading a great book or have just found a new job.

It helps me get a snippet of what you’re doing and feel more connected to you.

But saying “I’ve just had coffee” isn’t particularly of interest to many people – so maybe leave that for Facebook status updates rather than LinkedIn.

5. Promote with caution

If you’re going to self promote or make requests for help via the LinkedIn status updates, then do it sparingly.

If the only time people ever see your status updates is when you want something or are trying to promote something, then many contacts will view you as one of those people that only calls when they want something (..you know the type of people I mean).

But if you’re regularly sharing valuable, useful, interesting updates – then when you do want something or are promoting something, most people will have no issues with it. And in fact, are more likely to try and help you because you’re someone that shares openly.

6. Protect and enhance your Personal Brand

Remember, everything you write on LinkedIn is searchable via Google and other search engines. So any client, recruiter or employer will be able to see what you’re writing. And as every time you update your status, it’s an opportunity to enhance (or indeed damage) your personal brand.

So be clear about what you want to be known for, how you want people to perceive you and ensure that your status updates enhance your personal brand rather than damaging or diluting it.

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By the way, if you’re currently job searching and want to know how to use LinkedIn to find your next job, you may want to take a look at my instantly downloadable audio programme: “7 Ways To Find Your Next Job Using LinkedIn.”
I’ll talk and walk you through some simple, yet effective, ways to speed up your job search using LinkedIn. For further details, click here now.

LinkedIn Q & A [Part 5 of 7]: How To Get High Quality Recommedations On LinkedIn

Question: How do you get genuine, personalised recommendations on LinkedIn?

Answer: Here are 4 tips to follow:

1. Make personal requests for a recommendation via phone or face to face before sending the LinkedIn request for recommendation

2. Request results and benefits driven recommendations

3. Ask people to include comments on what they feel makes you different or unique

4. Get into the habit of giving your contacts personalised recommendations (without wanting anything back)

Have you any more tips or suggestions…? Feel free to add them in the comments box below.

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By the way, if you’re currently job searching and want to know how to use LinkedIn to find your next job, you may want to take a look at my instantly downloadable audio programme: “7 Ways To Find Your Next Job Using LinkedIn.”

I’ll talk and walk you through some simple, yet effective, ways to speed up your job search using LinkedIn. For further details, click here now.

LinkedIn Q & A [Part 4 of 7]: 3 Rules For Connecting With People You Don’t Know

Question: “Are there any guidelines on connecting with people you don’t know?”

Answer:

Here are 3 rules to follow:

1. Be respectful of what type of networker they are:

There are 3 types of people on LinkedIn:

a) ‘Open Networkers’

People who are open to connect with anyone who approaches them

b) People who will only connect with people they have a relationship with

I know some people who will absolutely never connect with people they don’t have a face to face relationship with. That’s their choice and their prerogative.

c) People who are somewhere in between

I’m one of the ‘in between’ types.

I’m not an open networker that says “anyone, come and connect with me”, but at same time on my website I openly invite people that read my blog and newsletter to connect with me. Similarly on my Facebook page, I have link backs to my LinkedIn page too. So what I’m saying is that I’m open to connecting with people on LinkedIn who have some type of relationship with me (even though we may not know each other personally). That’s my choice.

Everyone is different so take a few moments to read people’s profiles, website, blog (if they have one) to look for clues to what they prefer and be respectful in following their preferences and choices in how they use LinkedIn.

2. Where possible, always go via a mutual contact

In the offline world, if you want to connect with someone you don’t know, it’s always best to go via a warm introduction rather than making a cold approach. The same applies on LinkedIn.

So mention the mutual contact within your invitation note and you’re more likely to get a positive response and begin the relationship on a good footing. Hardly rocket science, but many people don’t think to do this and simply try and make a cold approach or don’t bother at all.

3. Personalize and ‘be nice’

I hate the standardized LinkedIn invites. I know it’s a small thing, but taking 30 seconds to personalize a message makes so much difference. It tells me you want to connect with me rather than simply clock up the number of connections you have.

So if I receive a LinkedIn invite from someone I don’t know but they’ve personalized the note I’m generally fine with it.

E.g. “Hi Sital, I read your blog and really enjoy it. I hope you don’t mind me adding you to my LinkedIn network”

or “Hi Sital, I heard you speak at xyz and really found what you had to say about abc interesting. Would it be ok for us to connect on LinkedIn..?”

I’m totally fine with connecting with these types of people – because they’re being polite, respectful and have taken a few seconds to personalize their note.

In summary

If someone doesn’t know you, is not an ‘open networker’, has no mutual contacts with you and sees that you haven’t bothered to spend 30 seconds writing a personalized note in the invite – why should they be bothered to join your LinkedIn network?

Be respectful, be personable and be nice – it works (most) of the time…

LinkedIn Q & A [Part 3 of 7]: How Well Must You Know Someone Before Connecting?

Question: ‘How well do I need to know someone before inviting them to connect on LinkedIn?”

Answer: Use the same common sense you’d use in the offline world

If you met someone at a networking event or conference, you’d usually exchange business cards and details once you’ve developed some kind of rapport or interaction with them. Sometimes it takes 20 minutes of conversation, sometimes it takes just 2 minutes – there are no hard and fast rules.

The same principle applies on LinkedIn – so use your common sense.

Consider how much rapport you have with them, how recently you interacted with them, how you came into contact with them (complete new contact or via a warm introduction) – and then, if you feel appropriate, invite them to connect by sending a personalized note (ie not using the standard LinkedIn invite).

“And what about connecting with people I don’t know? Is that a complete no no?”

I’ll answer that in tomorrow’s post.

LinkedIn Q & A [Part 1 of 7]: The Number One Rule For LinkedIn Users

In recent weeks I’ve had flurry of questions about using LinkedIn.

So over the next week I plan to post the 7 most common questions I’ve been asked along with my typical reply.

Here’s the first question and answer:

Question 1: “I’m just getting into LinkedIn – what would you say is your number one rule or principle for using LinkedIn?”

Answer: Focus on helping others, not just growing your network or ‘getting stuff’

The currency of networking is generosity – i.e. helping others.

And that’s what your focus should be when doing any kind of networking – being helpful and valuable to your network of contacts instead of simply trying to ‘get stuff’ from them – e.g. job leads, contacts or potential customers for your products and services.

LinkedIn is simply a networking tool – a technology platform to connect with your professional network.

And so the principle of being generous applies to your interactions on LinkedIn too. So if you’re new to LinkedIn,  don’t worry too much about how to do stuff – just keep asking  yourself “how can I help my contacts?” and  “how can I be of value to them?” and you’ll figure out everything else as you go along.

Just remember: We reep what we sow. So focus on cultivating a strong LinkedIn network by focussing on what you put into to it-  and in time all the support, contacts and leads will come to you (very often from different sources).

So what’s your number 1 LinkedIn rule or principle? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments box below.

Look out for the answer to Question 2 tomorrow:

Question 2: “What’s a good number of contacts to have on LinkedIn? How do I quickly increase the number of connections I have?

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By the way, if you’re currently job searching and want to know how to use LinkedIn to find your next job, you may want to take a look at my instantly downloadable audio programme: “7 Ways To Find Your Next Job Using LinkedIn.”

I’ll talk and walk you through some simple yet effective ways to speed up your job search using LinkedIn. For further details, click here now.